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SHO provides multiple options for students to participate in four different periods of time according to their needs or time limitations.

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Transfer Credit

Charles University in Prague uses the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS). All course subjects must be approved by your home institution for departmental credit.

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Body Diagnostics

Course name: Body diagnostics
Course number: PKIN706
Language of instruction: English
Credits: 3 ECTS
Contact Hours: 22
Term: Fall 2015, Spring 2016
Course meeting times: Will be updated
Course meeting place: Will be updated

Professor:PhDr. Martin Musalek, Ph.D.

Contact Information: musalek@ftvs.cuni.cz
Office address: H274
Office hours: Will be updated

Course Description

This course will provide instruction in the measurement of structural and physical fitness parameters of the human body related to the ontogeny of human movement behavior, with an understanding of the changes that occur in motor behavior over the entire lifespan. It will include opportunities for interactive exercises in the lab; for discussions designed to help students to understand issues relating to body diagnostic measurement; and for the observation and analysis of fundamental structural features and motor patterns as they are performed in various settings. The main emphasis is on the interpretation of collected data.

Course topics:
1. Understanding the concept of Body Diagnostics. Definition of the concept of measurement.
Definition of basic terms
2. Problems associated with the study of body diagnostics
3. The human body and its structural development in relation to life span and gender
4. Anthropometry, discipline for measurement of structural differences at human body
5. Fundamental Movement Abilities its structure and development in relation to life span and gender
6. Physical fitness tests. Feedback regarding body fitness, and its relation to human body structure (length and width of particular parts of human body), possible problems with the comparison of incomparables
7. Body diagnostics – measurement procedures – interpretation of collected data (distribution, relations, predictions, comparison with norms)

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course the student will:
– be able to demonstrate goals and objectives of the discipline of body diagnostics
– be able to identify common terms in body diagnostics
– be aware of the common problems associated with the study of body diagnostics

– be familiar with basic theoretical concepts of human motor abilities
– be knowledgeable about gender differences and similarities in body diagnostics
– be able to define changes in structural and functional features of the human body throughout the life span
– be able to describe basic anthropometry marks and their importance for the assessment of the human body in relation to the ontogeny of human movement behaviour
– be able to define and use various types of motor functional test for different populations (from child to senior)
– be able to measure (collect) and interpret data from body diagnostic measurement procedures

Course Prerequisites
None.

Methods of Instruction
A variety of instructional methods will be used in this course, including Internet research, reading assignments, discussion, reflection, presentation, peer evaluation, and hands-on practice.

– The course will alternate two types of theoretical sessions and one type of practical session
– Each topic will be firstly presented in a theoretical session. In these sessions a standard form of PowerPoint presentation will be used, with topic video presentations, and students will get paper hand-outs. This theoretical part of course will also provide the opportunity for student discussion about the current problematic. Finally, students will be given research papers with problems to solve.
– In the second theoretical lesson students will firstly discuss the research papers. The aim of this discussion will be the realization of how strong or weak may be the results from body diagnostics in the research field, based on diagnostic procedures – what the data and conclusions can tell us.
– Practical sessions will present applications of theoretical knowledge. Students will do measurements on one another. Again there will be the opportunity for final discussion and interpretation of data.

Assessment and Final Grade

1. Assessment Type 1: Individual oral presentation on recommended topics 35%

2. Assessment Type 2: Active approach in practical measurement 30%

3. Assessment Type 3: Homework 15%

4. Assessment Type 4: Active participation 20%

Marking scheme assessment PG 1-4 (1 = excellent; 4 = fail)

Course Requirements

Individual oral presentation on recommended topics

In the middle of the course students will asked to prepare and present a max. 10 minute PowerPoint presentation on a topic chosen from a list of topics related to structural and functional body diagnostics. This presentation will be divided into two parts a) theoretical background; b) practical impact in the sphere of sport and physical education

Active approach in practical measurement

During whole course students will do practical measurements in small teams. In the measurement of structural features (segments width, length, volume) of the human body, as well as in the measurement of functional motor skills, each student will participate as model. Moreover, each student must demonstrate 1) how and where to find anthropometric landmarks; 2) what are the rules for concrete measurement procedures – diagnostic of motor skills

Homework

Homework will be the comprehension of research papers distributed by the lecturer at the end of previous session. Therefore, the beginning of each session (except of the first one) will start with group discussion of the homework, led by the lecturer.

Active participation

In consideration of the character of the course, it will be an obligation for students to be actively engaged during all sessions.

Attendance
Attendance is mandatory.

Weekly Schedule

Week 1

Session 1: Human body
Introduction: structure and function, limitations associated to body diagnostic
Reading:
Eston, R. and Reilly, T. (2009). Kinanthropometry and Exercise Physiology Laboratory Manual: Tests Procedures and Data: Volume One: Anthropometry. Routlege: Abingdon. (pp. 7–18, 37–39).
Mei et al (2002). Validity of body mass index compared with other body-composition screening indexes for the assessment of body fatness in children and adolescents. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 7(6), 978–985.

Session 2: Body composition in relation to life span and gender
CDifferences in body composition between male and female, differences in definite life periods
Reading:
Suchomel, A. (2005). Somatic Parameters of Children with Low and High Levels of Motor Performance. Kinesiology, 37(2), 195–203.
Hughes et al (2004). Anthropometric assessment of 10-y changes in body composition in the elderly. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 80(2), 475-82.

Week 2

Session 3: Basic anthropometry
Practical measurement, field approaches – kinanthropometry
Reading:
Eston, R. and Reilly, T. (2009). Kinanthropometry and Exercise Physiology Laboratory Manual: Tests Procedures and Data: Volume One: Anthropometry. Routlege: Abingdon. (pp. 29–36)

Session 4: Somatotype
Introduction: endomorphy, ectomorphy, mezomorphy
Reading:
Eston, R. and Reilly, T. (2009). Kinanthropometry and Exercise Physiology Laboratory Manual: Tests Procedures and Data: Volume One: Anthropometry. Routlege: Abingdon. (pp. 54–79)

Week 3

Session 5: Somatotype
Relationship between results from kinanthropometry and somatotype
Reading:
Toth, T. et al (2014). Somatotypes in sport. Acta mechanica et Automatica, 8(1), 27–32.

Session 6: Somatotype
Practical measurement and interpretation of collected data

Week 4

Session 7: Movement Abilities
Introduction: structure – speed, strength
Reading:
Hohmann, A., Lames, M. and Letzelter, M. (2007): Einführung in die Trainingswissenschaft. Wiebelsheim: Limpert. (English version)

Session 8: Movement Abilities
Endurance, coordination, diagnostic tools for evaluation of movement abilities (physical fitness)

Week 5

Session 9: Physical Fitness (readiness)
Practical measurement, UNIFIT, EUROFIT
Reading:
Komestik, B. (2005). Motodiagnostic. Hradec Kralove: Univerzita Hradec Kralove. Unpublished presentation.

Session 10: Practical Field testing at league youth football team Dukla Praha

Session 11: Relation between body composition and physical fitness
Importance for prediction of performance in sport, limitations of this predictions
analysis of collected data, comparison with norms, distribution of data and its interpretation

Reading:
Eston, R. and Reilly, T. (2009). Kinanthropometry and Exercise Physiology Laboratory Manual: Tests Procedures and Data: Volume One: Anthropometry. Routlege: Abingdon. (pp. 250–272.

Week 6
Exams

Required reading

Carter, J. E. L. (2002). The Heath-Carter Anthropometric Somatotype: Instruction Manual. San Diego State University.

Eston, R. and Reilly, T. (2009). Kinanthropometry and Exercise Physiology Laboratory Manual: Tests Procedures and Data: Volume One: Anthropometry. Abingdon: Routlege.

Hohmann, A., Lames, M. and Letzelter, M. (2007). Einführung in die Trainingswissenschaft. Wiebelsheim:
Limpert. (English version)

Hughes, V. A., Roubenoff, R., Wood, M., Frontera, W. R., Evans, W. J. and Fiatarone, S. M. A. (2004). Anthropometric assessment of 10-y changes in body composition in the elderly. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 80(2), 475–482.

Komestik, B. (2005). Motodiagnostic. Hradec Kralove: Univerzita Hradec Kralove. Unpublished presentation.

Mei, Z., Grummer-Strawn, L. M., Pietrobelli, A., Goulding, A., Goran, M. I. and Dietz, W. H. (2002). Validity of body mass index compared with other body-composition screening indexes for the assessment of body fatness in children and adolescents. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 75(6), 978–985.

Suchomel, A. (2005). Somatic Parameters of Children with Low and High Levels of Motor Performance. Kinesiology, 37(2), 195–203.

Toth, T., Michalikova, M., Bednarcikova, L., Zivcak, J., and Kneppo, P. (2014). Somatotypes in sport. Acta mechanica et Automatica, 8(1), 27–32.

Further reading

Carter, J. E. L. and Heath, B. H. (1990). Somatotyping Development and Appications (pp. 198–396). Cambridge University Press: New York

Měkota, K. and Kovar, R. (1996). Unifittest (6-60): Test and Norms of Motor Performance and Physical Fitness in Youth and in Adult Age. Univerzita Palackeho: Olomouc.

Vaverka, F., Janura, M., Elfmark, M. and Salinger, J. (1998). The Relationships between Anthropometric Body Compositions and the Force-time Structure of the Vertical Jump. 16 International Symposium on Biomechanics in Sport, 1–4.

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