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Dates and Fees

SHO fee for the selected program you wish to partake in is a nearly all-inclusive fee, and really does cover all of the essentials of the student´s study abroad experience.

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Study Semesters

SHO provides multiple options for students to participate in four different periods of time according to their needs or time limitations.

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Transfer Credit

Charles University in Prague uses the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS). All course subjects must be approved by your home institution for departmental credit.

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Introduction to Outdoor Activities

Course name: Introduction to Outdoor Activities
Course number: PSPP702
Language of instruction: English
Credits: 3 ECTS
Contact Hours: 22
Term: Fall 2015, Spring 2016
Course meeting times: Will be updated
Course meeting place: Will be updated

Professor:Assist. Prof. Ivana Turčová, Ph.D.

Contact Information: turcova@ftvs.cuni.cz
Office address: D126
Office hours: Will be updated

Course Description

In this theoretical course, students will learn about the concept of outdoor activities, with a focus on the Czech approach. They will be introduced to the history of outdoor activities and outdoor education, and they will discuss terms such as adventure, risk, challenge, experience and their application in outdoor activities. They will learn about approaches to learning and education through the practice of outdoor activities. Students will be acquainted with current trends in society and their influence on the development and practice of outdoor activities.

Learning Objectives

The main goal of the course is to introduce students to the concepts of outdoor activities and outdoor education, with a focus on the Czech approach.
After the course students are expected to understand different approaches to outdoor education and activities compared with the Czech concept. They will be asked to discuss actively terms such as adventure, risk, challenge and experience, based on the readings provided and their own experience.

Course Prerequisites
None.

Methods of Instruction
Lectures including the use of PowerPoint presentations.
Class discussions and debates (in small groups), which will require home reading before the class.
Guest lecture.

Assessment and Final Grade

1. Assessment Type 1: Essay 30%

2. Assessment Type 2: Essay presentation 30%

3. Assessment Type 3: Survey of internet outdoor databases 20%

4. Assessment Type 4: Participation in sessions 20%

Marking scheme assessment PG 1-4 (1 = excellent; 4 = fail)

Course Requirements

Essay

Students are required to submit an essay (2000 words) on one of the following topics:
1. Outdoor learning in North America, in comparison with European approaches.
2. The contribution of a U.S. thinker (e.g. John Dewey, R.W. Emerson, H.D. Thoreau, etc.) to outdoor learning.
3. Advantages and disadvantages of experiential learning styles and “traditional” learning styles.
Criteria of evaluation: level of argumentation, scope and depth of coverage of a topic, originality.
Students should refer to at least 5 sources in their papers, use their own arguments and searches in the internet databases. All papers are accepted in the last credit week. Late papers will be marked down 5% after the first day and 1% every day afterwards. No coursework will be accepted after the last day of class.

Essay presentation

PowerPoint presentation of the written essay should last 10 minutes maximum. It will be followed by a 5 minute discussion in class.

Survey of internet outdoor databases

Students will be asked to look up internet databases related to outdoor activities and education, and to search outdoor discussion groups, library catalogues, and outdoor websites. This will take the form of prescribed homework, to be completed in pairs.

Class Participation

Students are expected to join in class debates and discussions, and to engage in groupwork.

Attendance
Attendance is mandatory.

Weekly Schedule

Week 1

Session 1: Introduction
Introduction to the course, topics and readings for the course; course requirements and assessment.

Session 2: Current trends in society and their influence on the development and practice of outdoor activities
Reasons for the demand for outdoor activities today, global trends, local traditions, artificial environments, future trends.
Reading:
Neuman, J. (2008). Future trends in outdoor activities. In I. Turčová, & A. Martin (Eds.). Outdoor Activities in Educational and Recreational Programmes (pp. 65-69). Prague: International Young Nature Friends.

Week 2

Session 3: The concepts of outdoor activities and outdoor education
The Czech approach to outdoor education and outdoor activities compared to the Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian or German approach. Czech “turistika”, dramaturgy, friluftsliv, Erlebnispädagogik.
Reading:
Higgins, P. and Loynes, C. (1996). Towards Consensus on the Nature of Outdoor Education. JAEOL, 13(4), 2-3.
Priest, S. (1985). Functional Outdoor Education. JAEOL, 2 (6), 19-20.

Session 4: Basic terminology in the outdoor education area
Terms related to outdoor activities: outdoor learning, outdoor education, adventure education, experiential education/learning, challenge education, adventure therapy, outdoor management training, etc.
Reading:
Turčová, I., Martin, A., Neuman, J. (2005). Diversity in language: Outdoor terminology in the Czech Republic and Britain. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor learning, 5(2), 101-117.

Week 3

Session 5: Information sources in the outdoor education area and their use
Information sources: databases, library catalogues, outdoor websites, journals, books.
A class debate based on home searches.
Homework:
Survey of internet outdoor databases (pair work).

Session 6: History of outdoor activities and outdoor education*
Historical roots of outdoor activities abroad and in the Czech Republic:
Comenius, the Sokol organization, Junák (Scouting), Woodcraft, Club of Czech Tourists, Jaroslav Foglar, Tramping. Guest lecture.
Reading:
Waic, M. and Kössl, J. (1996). The origin and development of organized Outdoor Activities in the Czech Countries. In J. Neuman, I. Mytting, and J. Brtník (Eds.). Outdoor activities: Proceedings of international seminar Prague ’94 Charles University (pp. 18-22). Lüneburg: Verlag Edition, Erlebnispädagogik.

Session 7: Adventure, risk, challenge, experience
Group discussions on the above terms based on homework reading.
Reading:

Hunt, J. (1989). In Search of Adventure. Guildford: Talbot-Adair Press.

Week 4

Session 8: Approaches to learning and education through the practice of outdoor activities
Experiential learning, experiential learning cycle, learning by doing, dramaturgy wave.
Reading:

Martin, A. (2011). The dramaturgy approach to education in nature. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 11(1), 67–82.

Session 9: Application of outdoor activities in practice
Schools, state institutions, youth organizations, travel agencies and outdoor companies using outdoor activities in the Czech Republic.
Job possibilities, qualifications, safety standards.

Week 5

Session 10: European dimension of outdoor learning
European institutions – the UK, Germany, France, Austria, Switzerland, other European countries.

Session 11: Credit week
Essay submission and presentation.

Required reading

Baláš, J., Vomáčko, L., Frainšic, M. and Šafránek, J. (2013). Multimediální učebnice Turistika a sporty v přírodě: Univerzita Karlova v Praze, Fakulta tělesné výchovy a sportu [online]. Praha: UK FTVS. Available from: http://www.ftvs.cuni.cz/eknihy/turistika. ISBN 978-80-87647-13-4.

Higgins, P. and Loynes, C. (1996). Towards Consensus on the Nature of Outdoor Education. JAEOL,13(4), 2-3.

Martin, A. (2011). The dramaturgy approach to education in nature. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 11(1), 67–82.

Neuman, J. (2008). Future trends in outdoor activities. In I. Turčová, & A. Martin (Eds.). Outdoor Activities in Educational and Recreational Programmes (pp. 65-69). Prague: International Young Nature Friends.

Priest, S. (1985). Functional Outdoor Education. JAEOL, 2(6), 19-20.

Turčová, I., Martin, A. and Neuman, J. (2005). Diversity in language: Outdoor terminology in the Czech Republic and Britain. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor learning, 5(2), 101-117.

Waic, M. and Kössl, J. (1996). The origin and development of organized Outdoor Activities in the Czech Countries. In J. Neuman, I. Mytting, and J. Brtník (Eds.). Outdoor activities: Proceedings of international seminar Prague ’94 Charles University (pp. 18-22). Lüneburg: Verlag Edition, Erlebnispädagogik.

Further reading

Ewert, A. W. (2014). Outdoor adventure education: foundations, theory, and research. Champaign, Il: Human Kinetics.

Priest, S. and Gass, M. A. (2005). Effective leadership in adventure programming. 2nd ed. Champaign, Il.: Human Kinetics.

*The exact time of this session is subject to change, depending on guest lecturer´s time.

About program

SHO works, partly, under the assumption that in many contexts the theoretical and participatory aspects of physical education and culture are often experienced as separate phenomena. SHO’s aspiration is to […]

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Admission Requirements for SHO Full Semester and Short-term program SHO accepts undergraduate students from all over the world, including universities that do not have a direct exchange agreement with Charles […]

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SHO’s extracurricular programs are, but not limited to, the following opportunities: Guest lectures that correspond directly with the students’ studies SHO Buddy Program Sport and Cultural Events (there are several, […]

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