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Dates and Fees

SHO fee for the selected program you wish to partake in is a nearly all-inclusive fee, and really does cover all of the essentials of the student´s study abroad experience.

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Study Semesters

SHO provides multiple options for students to participate in four different periods of time according to their needs or time limitations.

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Transfer Credit

Charles University in Prague uses the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS). All course subjects must be approved by your home institution for departmental credit.

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Outdoor Sports

Course name: Outdoor Sports in health related programs
Course number: PSPP703
Language of instruction: English
Credits: 3 ECTS
Contact Hours: 22
Term: Fall 2015, Spring 2016
Course meeting times: Will be updated
Course meeting place: Will be updated

Professor:Assist. Prof. Jiří Baláš, Ph.D.

Contact Information: balas@ftvs.cuni.cz
Office address: D127
Office hours: Will be updated

Course Description

In this theoretical-practical course, students will learn how to use outdoor sports in health-related programs. In the practical part, they will experience activities such as Nordic walking, slackline, climbing or parkour. Each session will represent an example of a typical program to develop physical fitness components – strength, aerobic fitness, balance or flexibility. In the theoretical part, they will learn about the use of the outdoor environment or outdoor activities for developing physical fitness in different populations.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
– Learn how to use outdoor sports in health-related programs.
– Acquire basic knowledge about fitness assessment in the field.
– Acquire basic knowledge about fitness assessment in the field.

Course Prerequisites
None.

Methods of Instruction
Theoretical part – Power Point presentations, class debates.
Practical part – field trips with invited experts in selected outdoor sports, practical assessment of exercise intensity and physical fitness in field settings. Demonstration of typical outdoor activities to develop physical fitness.

Assessment and Final Grade

1. Assessment Type 1: Practical test 25%

2. Assessment Type 2: Theoretical test 25%

3. Assessment Type 3: Homework – reading of proposed literature 25%

4. Assessment Type 4: Participation in sessions 25%

Marking scheme assessment PG 1-4 (1 = excellent; 4 = fail)

Course Requirements

Practical test

Students must show practical knowledge in prescribing selected outdoor activity. Theoretical background and practical leading of the demonstration will be assessed

Theoretical test

The theoretical test assesses the student’s knowledge of physical activity assessment and prescription. The minimal level of success is 50% of correct answers.

Homework – reading of proposed literature

Reading recommended texts before the sessions, preparing for discussions of the suggested themes.

Participation in sessions

Students are expected to adopt an active approach during the sessions, to engage in groupwork, and be willing to interact effectively.

Attendance
Attendance is mandatory.

Weekly Schedule

Week 1

Session 1: Orientation Week
Introduction to class

Session 2: Physical fitness, physical activity and health – the role of the natural environment
General concept of physical fitness and its relationship to health.
Fitness assessment vs. physical activity assessment.
Guidelines for populations.
The role of the natural environment.
Reading:

Garber, C. E., Blissmer, B., Deschenes, M. R., Franklin, B. A., Lamonte, M. J., Lee, I. M., et al. (2011). Quantity and Quality of Exercise for Developing and Maintaining Cardiorespiratory, Musculoskeletal, and Neuromotor Fitness in Apparently Healthy Adults: Guidance for Prescribing Exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(7), 1334-1359.

Week 2

Session 3: Assessment of aerobic fitness and body composition
Basic principles of assessing aerobic fitness and body composition. Designing cardiorespiratory exercise programs. Designing weight management and body composition programs.
Reading:

Heyward, V. H. and Gibson, A. L. (2014). Advanced fitness assessment and exercise prescription (7th ed.). Champaign, Il: Human Kinetics. Chapter on Assessing cardiorspiratory fitness.

Session 4: Assessment of strength, flexibility and balance
Basic principles of assessing muscular strength. Designing resistance training programs.
Reading:

Heyward, V. H. and Gibson, A. L. (2014). Advanced fitness assessment and exercise prescription (7th ed.). Champaign, Il: Human Kinetics. Chapter on Assessing muscular fitness and flexibility

Week 3

Session 5: Climbing in fitness programs for adults and children
Practical application of climbing in functional strength programs. Different approaches for children and adults.
Reading:
Baláš, J., Strejcová, B., Malý, T., Malá, L. and Martin, A. J. (2009). Changes in upper body strength and body composition after 8 weeks indoor climbing in youth. Isokinetics and Exercise Science, 17(3), 173-179.
Muehlbauer, T., Granacher, U., Jockel, B. and Kittel, R. (2013). Muscle Activation during Therapeutic Climbing Exercises. Sportverletzung-Sportschaden, 27(3), 162-168.

Session 6: Nordic Walking in low and high fitness participants
Practical application of NW. Assessment of cardiovascular intensity of exercise. Different approaches for low fitness and high fitness subjects.
Reading:
Figard-Fabre, H., Fabre, N., Leonardi, A. and Schena, F. (2009). Physiological and perceptual responses to Nordic walking in obese middle-aged women in comparison with the normal walk. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 108(6), 1141-1151.
Kukkonen-Harjula, K., Hiilloskorpi, H., Mänttäri, A., Pasanen, M., Parkkari, J., Suni, J., et al. (2007). Self-guided brisk walking training with or without poles: a randomized-controlled trial in middle-aged women. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 17(4), 316-323.
Schiffer, T., Knicker, A., Hoffman, U., Harwig, B., Hollmann, W. and Struder, H. K. (2006). Physiological responses to nordic walking, walking and jogging. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 98(1), 56-61.

Session 7: Parkour for adolescents
Why is the younger generation attracted to parkour exercises? Practical demonstration of parkour to develop balance, coordination and explosive strength. Application of the concept of ‘challenge by choice’.

Week 4

Session 8: Slackline for postural stability development
Practical application of slackline programs to develop balance and muscular strength.
Reading:

Pfusterschmied, J., Buchecker, M., Keller, M., Wagner, H., Taube, W. and Mueller, E. (2013). Supervised slackline training improves postural stability. European Journal of Sport Science, 13(1), 49-57.
Pfusterschmied, J., Stoeggl, T., Buchecker, M., Lindinger, S., Wagner, H. and Mueller, E. (2013). Effects of 4-week slackline training on lower limb joint motion and muscle activation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 16(6), 562-566.

Session 9: Games and exercises in nature
Traditional concept of exercise in nature. Based on traditional approaches (Guts-Muths, Méthode naturelle, German Turner system, Czech Sokol movement), the students will learn how to enjoy physical exercise in a group in natural environment.
Reading:
Neuman, J. (2004). Education and learning through outdoor activities: games and problem solving activities, outdoor exercises and rope courses for youth programmes (1st ed.). Praha: Duha.

Week 5

Session 10: Practical exam
Preparation of physical activity for a selected population to develop a particular component of physical fitness using a chosen outdoor activity.

Session 11: Theoretical exam
Written test

Required reading

Baláš, J., Strejcová, B., Maly, T., Malá, L. and Martin, A. J. (2009). Changes in upper body strength and body composition after 8 weeks indoor climbing in youth. Isokinetics and Exercise Science, 17(3), 173-179.

Figard-Fabre, H., Fabre, N., Leonardi, A. and Schena, F. (2009). Physiological and perceptual responses to Nordic walking in obese middle-aged women in comparison with the normal walk. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 108(6), 1141-1151.

Garber, C. E., Blissmer, B., Deschenes, M. R., Franklin, B. A., Lamonte, M. J., Lee, I. M., et al. (2011). Quantity and Quality of Exercise for Developing and Maintaining Cardiorespiratory, Musculoskeletal, and Neuromotor Fitness in Apparently Healthy Adults: Guidance for Prescribing Exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(7), 1334-1359.

Heyward, V. H. and Gibson, A. L. (2014). Advanced fitness assessment and exercise prescription (7th ed.). Champaign, Il: Human Kinetics.

Kukkonen-Harjula, K., Hiilloskorpi, H., Mänttäri, A., Pasanen, M., Parkkari, J., Suni, J., et al. (2007). Self-guided brisk walking training with or without poles: a randomized-controlled trial in middle-aged women. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 17(4), 316-323.

Muehlbauer, T., Granacher, U., Jockel, B. and Kittel, R. (2013). Muscle Activation during Therapeutic Climbing Exercises. Sportverletzung-Sportschaden, 27(3), 162-168.

Neuman, J. (2004). Education and learning through outdoor activities: games and problem solving activities, outdoor exercises and rope courses for youth programmes (1st ed.). Praha: Duha.

Pfusterschmied, J., Buchecker, M., Keller, M., Wagner, H., Taube, W. and Mueller, E. (2013). Supervised slackline training improves postural stability. European Journal of Sport Science, 13(1), 49-57.

Pfusterschmied, J., Stoeggl, T., Buchecker, M., Lindinger, S., Wagner, H. and Mueller, E. (2013). Effects of 4-week slackline training on lower limb joint motion and muscle activation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 16(6), 562-566.

Schiffer, T., Knicker, A., Hoffman, U., Harwig, B., Hollmann, W. and Struder, H. K. (2006). Physiological responses to nordic walking, walking and jogging. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 98(1), 56-61.

Further reading

Draper, N. and Marshall, H. (2013). Exercise physiology : for health and sports performance. Harlow: Pearson.

ACSM. (2014). ACSM’s Guidelines for exercise testing and prescription (9 ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Åstrand, P. O., Rodahl, K., Dahl, H. and Stromme, S. (2003). Textbook of Work Physiology (4th ed.). Champaign, Il.: Human Kinetics.

*The exact time of this session is subject to change, depending on guest lecturer´s time.

About program

SHO works, partly, under the assumption that in many contexts the theoretical and participatory aspects of physical education and culture are often experienced as separate phenomena. SHO’s aspiration is to […]

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Admission Requirements for SHO Full Semester and Short-term program SHO accepts undergraduate students from all over the world, including universities that do not have a direct exchange agreement with Charles […]

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Contact: Luděk Brouček SHO Program Director ludek.broucek@sho-prague.com Luděk Brouček is responsible for the overall management and operation of the SHO program, working in consultation with the SHO Faculty Academic Board. […]

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SHO’s extracurricular programs are, but not limited to, the following opportunities: Guest lectures that correspond directly with the students’ studies SHO Buddy Program Sport and Cultural Events (there are several, […]

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