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Dates and FeesStudy SemestersTransfer Credit

Dates and Fees

SHO fee for the selected program you wish to partake in is a nearly all-inclusive fee, and really does cover all of the essentials of the student´s study abroad experience.

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Study Semesters

SHO provides multiple options for students to participate in four different periods of time according to their needs or time limitations.

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Transfer Credit

Charles University in Prague uses the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS). All course subjects must be approved by your home institution for departmental credit.

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Sport Nutrition

Course name: Sports Nutrition
Course number: XXX
Language of instruction: English
Credits: 3 ECTS
Contact Hours: 22
Term: Fall 2015, Spring 2016
Course meeting times: Will be updated
Course meeting place: Will be updated

Professor: Assist. Prof. Miroslav Petr, Ph.D.

Contact Information: petr@ftvs.cuni.cz
Office address: Main building
Office hours: Will be updated

Course Description

An optimal diet that meets energy intake needs and incorporates correct timing of nutrients is the foundation upon which a proper training program can be developed. Nutrition influences nearly every process in the body involved in energy production and recovery from exercise. This course in Sport Nutrition is designed to enable students to understand how to apply the principles of sport nutrition in the context of biochemical and physiological processes that occur in different tissues of the human body during and after exercise. Topics to be discussed will include: fuel sources for muscle and exercise metabolism, macronutrient and micronutrient requirements, the basics of nutritional genomics, nutritional supplements, and weight management.

Learning Objectives
Students will:
– Learn to identify the nutritional needs of a body under physical stress
– Understand nutritional needs in relation to specific adaptation and objectives in different sport activities
– Be able to prepare a nutritional plan for a specific athlete
– Understand research strategies in sport nutrition.

Course Prerequisites
None.

Methods of Instruction
Partly lectures (with and without PowerPoint presentations), but the main focus is on group work (small group discussions), consideration of case studies, etc.

Assessment and Final Grade

1. Assessment Type 1: Individual presentation on a topic in sports ethics 50%

2. Assessment Type 2: Homework 30%

3. Assessment Type 3: Participation in sessions 20%

Marking scheme assessment PG 1-4 (1 = excellent; 4 = fail)

Course Requirements

Written test

Written test contains 15 open questions.
Criteria of evaluation: each answer is evaluated:
0 points – bad answer or no answer
1 point – average knowledge
2 points – excellent answer
To pass a test students must have at least 15 points.

Individual presentations

The presentation must be designed so as to be interactive, making the group think about and work upon the highlighted nutritional topic.
Criteria of evaluation: scope and depth of coverage of a topic, appropriateness of the form of the lesson, engagement of other students.

Homework

Reading recommended texts before the lessons, being prepared for discussions of the suggested themes.

Participation in sessions

Engagement in groupwork, willingness to interact effectively, meaningful contribution to the sessions.

Attendance
Attendance is mandatory.

Weekly Schedule

Week 1

Session 1 Overview of macronutrients
Discussion of the differences between mono-, oligo- and poly-saccharides, the importance of glycemic index, three major forms of fat, major function of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in the body, biological value of proteins, optimal composition of macronutrients in diet.
Reading:
Jeukendrup, A., Gleeson, M. (2004). Sport nutrition: An introduction to energy production and performance (1st ed.): Human Kinetics. (pp. 2-14)
Gardner, C. D., Kiazand, A., et al. (2007). Comparison of the Atkins, Zone, Ornish, and LEARN diets for change in weight and related risk factors among overweight premenopausal women: the A TO Z Weight Loss Study: a randomized trial. JAMA, 297(9), 969-977.

Session 2 Nutritional assessment and counselling athletes
Assessing nutrient and energy intake. Analysing nutrient intake.
Reading:
Jeukendrup, A., & Gleeson, M. (2004). General Principles of Nutrition. In A. Jeukendrup & M. Gleeson (Eds.), Sport nutrition: An introduction to energy production and performance (1st. ed., pp. 25-28): Human Kinetics.

Week 2

Session 3 Indirect measurement of energy expenditure
Session in a laboratory.
Reading:
Pettee, K. K., Tudor-Locke, C., & Ainsworth, B. E. (2008). The Measurement of Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity. In I. Wolinsky & J. A. Driskell (Eds.), Sport Nutrition, Energy Metabolism and Exercise (pp. 159-169): Taylor & Francis Groupoverweight premenopausal women: the A TO Z Weight Loss Study: a randomized trial. JAMA, 297(9), 969-977.

Session 4 Weight loss ingredients
Discussing the popularity of weight loss ingredients, the origin and theoretical mechanisms of function for a series of weight loss ingredients, actual scientifically proven effects of a variety of weight loss ingredients
Reading:
Talbot, S. M. & Hughes, K. (2007). Weight Loss Supplements. In S. M. Talbot & K. Hughes (Eds.), The Health Professional´s Guide to Dietary Supplements (pp. 1-31): Lippincott Williams a Wilkins.

Week 3

Session 5 Visit to the largest e-shop with sport nutrition products in the Czech Rep.
Discussion about sales, the most popular supplements, and sales strategies.

Session 6 Muscle protein synthesis and consumption of sport protein products
Discussing the regulation of net muscle protein balance, administration of protein concentrates, isolates, and hydrolysates, lactose intolerance.
Reading:
Phillips, S. M., Hartman, J. W., & Wilkinson, S. B. (2005). Dietary protein to support anabolism with resistance exercise in young men. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 24(2), 134S-139S.

Session 7 Nutritional needs of endurance athlete
Discussing the specificity of endurance performance; nutrition before, during, and after exercise for the endurance athlete.
Reading:
Ivy, J. L. (2008). Nutrition Before, During, and After Exercise for the Endurance Athlete. In J. Antonio, D. Kalman, J. Stout, M. Greewood, D. Willoughby & G. G. Haff (Eds.), Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements (pp. 621-647): Humana Press.

Week 4

Session 8 Nutritional needs of strength/power athlete
Discussing the specificity of endurance performance; nutrition before, during, and after exercise for the strength/power athlete.
Reading:
Rasmussen, C. J. (2008). Nutrition Before, During, and After Exercise for the Strength/Power Athlete. In J. Antonio, D. Kalman, J. Stout, M. Greewood, D. Willoughby & G. G. Haff (Eds.), Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements (pp. 647-666): Humana Press.

Session 9 Short-term activities and creatine supplementation
Consideration of three energy systems; discussing the meaning of creatine supplementation in athletes, and which strategies might be used.
Reading:
Cooper, R., Naclerio, F., Allgrove, J. & Jimenez, A. (2012). Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 9(1), 33.

Week 5

Session 10 Eating and exercise to improve body composition
Discussing strategies to improve body composition, aerobic vs anaerobic exercise, factors effecting basal metabolic rate, factors limiting stress hormone,
thyroid balance, etc.

Session 11 Nutrigenomics and sport genomics
Discussing the concept of personalised nutrition, causing a paradigm shift from the mindset of ‘one-diet-fits-all’ to ‘the right diet for the right person at the right time’.
Reading:
Fenech, M., El-Sohemy, A. et al. (2011). Nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics: viewpoints on the current status and applications in nutrition research and practice. J Nutrigenet Nutrigenomics, 4(2), 69-89.

Week 5 Exams

Required reading

Cooper, R., Naclerio, F., Allgrove, J. & Jimenez, A. (2012). Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 9(1), 33.

Fenech, M., El-Sohemy, A. et al. (2011). Nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics: viewpoints on the current status and applications in nutrition research and practice. J Nutrigenet Nutrigenomics, 4(2), 69-89.

Gardner, C. D., Kiazand, A. et al. (2007). Comparison of the Atkins, Zone, Ornish, and LEARN diets for change in weight and related risk factors among overweight premenopausal women: the A TO Z Weight Loss Study: a randomized trial. JAMA, 297(9), 969-977.

Ivy, J. L. (2008). Nutrition Before, During, and After Exercise for the Endurance Athlete. In J. Antonio, D. Kalman, J. Stout, M. Greewood, D. Willoughby & G. G. Haff (Eds.), Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements (pp. 621-647): Humana Press.

Jeukendrup, A. & Gleeson, M. (2004). General Principles of Nutrition. In A. Jeukendrup & M. Gleeson (Eds.), Sport nutrition: An introduction to energy production and performance (1st ed., pp. 25-28): Human Kinetics.

Pettee, K. K., Tudor-Locke, C. & Ainsworth, B. E. (2008). The Measurement of Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity. In I. Wolinsky & J. A. Driskell (Eds.), Sport Nutrition, Energy Metabolism and Exercise (pp. 159-169): Taylor & Francis Group

Phillips, S. M., Hartman, J. W. & Wilkinson, S. B. (2005). Dietary protein to support anabolism with resistance exercise in young men. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 24(2), 134S-139S.

Rasmussen, C. J. (2008). Nutrition Before, During, and After Exercise for the Strength/Power Athlete. In J. Antonio, D. Kalman, J. Stout, M. Greewood, D. Willoughby & G. G. Haff (Eds.), Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements (pp. 647-666): Humana Press.

Cooper, R., Naclerio, F., Allgrove, J. & Jimenez, A. (2012). Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 9(1), 33.

Talbot, S. M. & Hughes, K. (2007). Weight Loss Supplements. In S. M. Talbot & K. Hughes (Eds.), The Health Professional´s Guide to Dietary Supplements (pp. 1-31): Lippincott Williams a Wilkins.

About program

SHO works, partly, under the assumption that in many contexts the theoretical and participatory aspects of physical education and culture are often experienced as separate phenomena. SHO’s aspiration is to […]

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Admissions

Admission Requirements for SHO Full Semester and Short-term program SHO accepts undergraduate students from all over the world, including universities that do not have a direct exchange agreement with Charles […]

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Contact us

Contact: Luděk Brouček SHO Program Director ludek.broucek@sho-prague.com Luděk Brouček is responsible for the overall management and operation of the SHO program, working in consultation with the SHO Faculty Academic Board. […]

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Courses

The length of courses is typically 22 contact hours (6 weeks). Compulsory Credits Course Code Introduction to Sport Humanities 3 ECTS PKIN700 Czech Physical Culture 3 ECTS PKIN701 Research Methods […]

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Student life

SHO’s extracurricular programs are, but not limited to, the following opportunities: Guest lectures that correspond directly with the students’ studies SHO Buddy Program Sport and Cultural Events (there are several, […]

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